AIRCRAFT FLEET

To handle the swelling number of air travelers, the air carrier fleets need to be upgraded with larger aircraft. Most of the growth in fleet size of the major U. S. carriers will occur after 2000, when aging aircraft are replaced with newer, more effi­cient aircraft. The fleet size, with its upswing after 2000, is shown in Fig. 5 (1).

Table 3. Forecast Passenger Enplanements at the 10 Busiest US Airports

1995 2010 %

Rank City-Airport Enplanements Enplanements Growth

1.

Chicago O’Hare

31,255,738

50,133,000

60.4

2.

Atlanta Hartsfield

27,350,320

46,416,000

69.7

3.

Dallas-Fort Worth

26,612,579

46,553,000

74.9

4.

Los Angeles

25,851,031

45,189,000

74.8

5.

San Francisco

16,700,975

28,791,000

72.4

6.

Miami

16,242,081

34,932,000

115.1

7.

Denver

14,818,822

22,751,000

53.5

8.

New York JFK

14,782,367

21,139,000

43.0

9.

Detroit Metropolitan

13,810,517

24,220,000

75.4

10.

Phoenix Sky Harbor

13,472,480

25,408,000

88.6

Total for top 100 airports

543,439,185

919,145,000

69.1

AIRCRAFT FLEET

6000

5000

4000

3000

2000

1000

Figure 5. Jet aircraft forecast to be in 0

service by US air carriers 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

7000

At the end of 1995, U. S. air carriers had firm orders placed for 604 new aircraft and options on an additional 799 aircraft. The price tag for the firm orders was $35.5 billion. The firm orders were distributed among aircraft from Airbus Indus­tries, Boeing Commercial Aircraft Company, McDonnell – Douglas Aircraft Company, and the Canadian Regional Jet. The most popular aircraft on order was the Boeing 737, with 218 firm orders and 260 options.

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